Ally


It was 1956 and my Tia Alicia, Tio Antonio and their seven daughters were farm workers living in a three-bedroom, one bathroom shack on a huge strawberry farm close to Highway 1, the Pacific Ocean, in the agricultural community of Watsonville.

Strawberry Farm Dreams


My education is something I definitely take for granted sometimes so I try to remind myself that many others would die for the opportunity to get an education...

My Life So Far


Another part of my life, my formative years shaped, was my pursuit of long-distance running. I began running cross-country and track my freshman year of high school.

The Mountains are Calling



Saw on classroom wall “without a struggle there can be no progress”

Tethered


In school, I had a lot of classmates who were Latin@ or black. I knew we lived in a diverse society. After school, my neighborhood friends and I would exchange food our parents cooked us-- my sister and I traded steamed rice for warm tortillas. I didn’t understand what was so tasty about plain white rice but I guess my friends thought similarly about the tortillas I coveted.

Steamed Rice and Tortillas


After that I started doing more extreme things, and then what I was doing back then became a habit.

I Like Sports!



Giving up is not an option. Only when all people are recognized and respected and treated with dignity will the fight end. Only when we decide that we belong to the same tribe – the human race!

La Raza Humana


We were in the country where her parents were born, but she was not welcome to own her identity by calling herself Hondureña.

Journeying


Teachers are the solution to help social justice become justice.

Her Dream



I know and believe in the long game, the years long struggle to fix what was purposefully broken. I can be angry and humble. I can be frustrated and introspective. My hate and sadness burn together, they fuel my drive to give back, to demand equality, equity, diversity, and recognition.

Recognition